365timeline.com

Search trending image and video from popular Instagram user

Show posts for #apaheritagemonth

Choreographers Shivani Bhagwan (@shivanibhagwan) and Chaya Kumar (@chayakumar) are the brains behind BFunk (@bfunk). “BFunk stands for the two styles of dance that we teach: BhangraFunk and BollyFunk,” explains Shivani. “It’s a fusion between elements of our western upbringing and our eastern roots,” explains Chaya. “Our heritage is woven through every fiber of our work. Dance is not a recreation in India; it’s a part of our culture. It’s a means of celebration. It’s a means of storytelling. It’s a means of communication.”
According to Shivani, “#APAHeritageMonth is wonderful because it promotes education, drives conversation and builds awareness, and that is the birthplace for growth.”
Photo of @bfunk by @pavithraphotos Choreographers shivani bhagwan (@shivanibhagwan ) and chaya kumar (@chayakumar ) are the brains behind bfunk (@bfunk ). “bfunk stands for the two styles of dance that we teach: bhangrafunk and bollyfunk,” explains shivani. “it’s a fusion between elements of our western upbringing and our eastern roots,” explains chaya. “our heritage is woven through every fiber of our work. dance is not a recreation in india; it’s a part of our culture. it’s a means of celebration. it’s a means of storytelling. it’s a means of communication.”
according to shivani, “#apaheritagemonth is wonderful because it promotes education, drives conversation and builds awareness, and that is the birthplace for growth.”
photo of @bfunk by @pavithraphotos
1,081,857 18,151 May 2019
“Cooking has always been a conversation between my own lifestyle and the culture I’m from,” says food photographer and recipe developer Hannah Che (@hannah__chia), who has lived all over the world — from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Guangdong, China. “Honoring my heritage means connecting the food I make to the past, but also using it as a conversation to explore my own identity and tell my own story.”
For Hannah, #APAheritagemonth helps celebrate the diversity of Asian Pacific American people’s cultures and origins. “But it shouldn’t just be this month,” she says. “There are so many incredible things that Asian Pacific Americans are doing out there that really should be more visible year round.”
This post is in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, celebrated every May in the United States.
Photo by @hannah__chia “cooking has always been a conversation between my own lifestyle and the culture i’m from,” says food photographer and recipe developer hannah che (@hannah__chia ), who has lived all over the world — from pittsburgh, pennsylvania, to guangdong, china. “honoring my heritage means connecting the food i make to the past, but also using it as a conversation to explore my own identity and tell my own story.”
for hannah, #apaheritagemonth helps celebrate the diversity of asian pacific american people’s cultures and origins. “but it shouldn’t just be this month,” she says. “there are so many incredible things that asian pacific americans are doing out there that really should be more visible year round.”
this post is in celebration of asian pacific american heritage month, celebrated every may in the united states.
photo by @hannah__chia
1,077,808 10,003 May 2019
Artist Sean “Hula” Yoro (@the_hula) first made waves in the art world by combining his loves of surfing and painting. 👋 In his first-ever mural series, he paddled out to paint along ocean walls. “There is rarely one process I use, but I enjoy the new challenges every site brings,” says Sean.
“Since the start of my career, I have always drawn my inspiration back to my Hawaiian upbringing in the unique melting pot of island culture,” says the artist from Kahalu’u, Hawaii. “One value that has always stuck with me no matter where I have moved to is the term we call ‘kuleana.’ It is the responsibility we are taught as kids to know your role and responsibility in society for the better of your community.”
This post is in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, celebrated every May in the United States. #APAheritagemonth
Photo by @the_hula Artist sean “hula” yoro (@the_hula ) first made waves in the art world by combining his loves of surfing and painting. 👋 in his first-ever mural series, he paddled out to paint along ocean walls. “there is rarely one process i use, but i enjoy the new challenges every site brings,” says sean.
“since the start of my career, i have always drawn my inspiration back to my hawaiian upbringing in the unique melting p*t of island culture,” says the artist from kahalu’u, hawaii. “one value that has always stuck with me no matter where i have moved to is the term we call ‘kuleana.’ it is the responsibility we are taught as kids to know your role and responsibility in society for the better of your community.”
this post is in celebration of asian pacific american heritage month, celebrated every may in the united states. #apaheritagemonth photo by @the_hula
973,112 8,908 May 2019
japchae— korean stir-fried glass noodles. clingy, chewy noodles tossed with stir-fried vegetables and shiitake mushrooms, fragrant with garlic and sesame oil. still one of my favorites dishes. .
.
.
.
Korean Stir-Fried Glass Noodles (Japchae)
 4 oz Korean sweet potato starch noodles
 5 oz (about one small bunch) spinach, washed and drained
 3 oz extra-firm tofu
 ½ medium onion, thinly sliced
 ½ red bell pepper, thinly sliced
 1 carrot, cut into matchsticks
 3 stalks green onions, cut into 1 inch lengthwise strips
 4 shiitake mushrooms, sliced thinly
 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
 3 tbsp soy sauce or tamari (for gluten-free)
 1 tbsp sugar
 2 tbsp sesame oil
 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds, for garnish
 salt and pepper to taste
Bring water to boil in a large pot, then add noodles and cook for 6-8 minutes, until soft but still slightly chewy. Drain and rinse in cold water, then cut in half with scissors.
•
For the spinach, blanch in a separate pot (bring water to a boil and throw in spinach for one minute until wilted), then rinse the spinach under cold running water, squeeze into a ball, and cut the ball several times.
•
In a nonstick pan, cook the tofu until browned on both sides, then remove from pan.
Next, sauté the onion, mushroom, bell pepper, and carrot together for 2 minutes until softened, then add in green onions and cook for another minute.
•
Finally, add in the noodles to the pan, the minced garlic, soy sauce, sugar, and sesame oil. Taste and add salt as desired. Toss until well combined, and sprinkle with the sesame seeds. Serve warm. Japchae— korean stir-fried glass noodles. clingy, chewy noodles tossed with stir-fried vegetables and shiitake mushrooms, fragrant with garlic and sesame oil. still one of my favorites dishes. .
.
.
.
korean stir-fried glass noodles (japchae)
4 oz korean sweet potato starch noodles
5 oz (about one small bunch) spinach, washed and drained
3 oz extra-firm tofu
½ medium onion, thinly sliced
½ red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 carrot, cut into matchsticks
3 stalks green onions, cut into 1 inch lengthwise strips
4 shiitake mushrooms, sliced thinly
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
3 tbsp soy sauce or tamari (for gluten-free)
1 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds, for garnish
salt and pepper to taste
bring water to boil in a large pot, then add noodles and cook for 6-8 minutes, until soft but still slightly chewy. drain and rinse in cold water, then cut in half with scissors.

for the spinach, blanch in a separate p*t (bring water to a boil and throw in spinach for one minute until wilted), then rinse the spinach under cold running water, squeeze into a ball, and cut the ball several times.

in a nonstick pan, cook the tofu until browned on both sides, then remove from pan.
next, sauté the onion, mushroom, bell pepper, and carrot together for 2 minutes until softened, then add in green onions and cook for another minute.

finally, add in the noodles to the pan, the minced garlic, soy sauce, sugar, and sesame oil. taste and add salt as desired. toss until well combined, and sprinkle with the sesame seeds. serve warm.
5,192 147 May 2019
Cute chubby me ☺️☺️☺️
#embraceyourcurves 
Art credits: @happyfluffcomics 
#apaheritagemonth Cute chubby me ☺️☺️☺️
#embraceyourcurves
art credits: @happyfluffcomics
#apaheritagemonth
12,109 72 May 2019
Cute chubby me ☺️☺️☺️
#embraceyourcurves 
Art credits: @happyfluffcomics 
#apaheritagemonth Cute chubby me ☺️☺️☺️
#embraceyourcurves
art credits: @happyfluffcomics
#apaheritagemonth
21,018 111 May 2019
Crispy baked tofu coated in a homemade teriyaki sauce by @hannah__chia 🔥 great over ramen noodles or steamed rice!
Who here lives Asian food? Did we mention that this dish was featured on @instagram in May in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, celebrated every May in the United States! Well done Hannah! #APAheritagemonth

Recipe:
1 14 oz block extra-firm tofu
1-2 tbsp cornstarch
1/2 tbsp olive oil
Sauce:
4 tbsp tamari or gf soy sauce
2 tbsp water
2 tbsp coconut sugar or brown sugar
1/2 tsp maple syrup
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp grated ginger
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1/2 tbsp cornstarch
•
Preheat oven to 400F/200C. Cut tofu into slices and then 1-inch cubes, and then place in an even layer on a clean towel. Place another towel on the top and put something heavy on top, pressing for about 10 minutes until dry. Toss tofu cubes in a bowl with the cornstarch and oil until evenly coated. Arrange on parchment paper on a baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes, until crispy.
•
For the teriyaki sauce, add all ingredients to a small pot and whisk together until smooth. Bring to a boil and continue whisking until sauce thickens to desired consistency. Taste and adjust. If sauce is too thick, thin with additional water. Toss the baked tofu with a few spoonfuls of the sauce in a bowl until completely coated. Serve over rice or noodles with vegetables of your choice.
•
Notes: 
If you double the sauce recipe it makes a lot of teriyaki sauce; enough to cover tofu and have leftover to glaze veggies/serve with rice. Crispy baked tofu coated in a homemade teriyaki sauce by @hannah__chia 🔥 great over ramen noodles or steamed rice!
who here lives asian food? did we mention that this dish was featured on @instagram in may in celebration of asian pacific american heritage month, celebrated every may in the united states! well done hannah! #apaheritagemonth
recipe:
1 14 oz block extra-firm tofu
1-2 tbsp cornstarch
1/2 tbsp olive oil
sauce:
4 tbsp tamari or gf soy sauce
2 tbsp water
2 tbsp coconut sugar or brown sugar
1/2 tsp maple syrup
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp grated ginger
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1/2 tbsp cornstarch

preheat oven to 400f/200c. cut tofu into slices and then 1-inch cubes, and then place in an even layer on a clean towel. place another towel on the top and put something heavy on top, pressing for about 10 minutes until dry. toss tofu cubes in a bowl with the cornstarch and oil until evenly coated. arrange on parchment paper on a baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes, until crispy.

for the teriyaki sauce, add all ingredients to a small p*t and whisk together until smooth. bring to a boil and continue whisking until sauce thickens to desired consistency. taste and adjust. if sauce is too thick, thin with additional water. toss the baked tofu with a few spoonfuls of the sauce in a bowl until completely coated. serve over rice or noodles with vegetables of your choice.

notes:
if you double the sauce recipe it makes a lot of teriyaki sauce; enough to cover tofu and have leftover to glaze veggies/serve with rice.
4,024 44 last month
Thank you to everyone at @verygoodlight for bringing us all together and shining a light on something that is near and dear to my heart. Check out the full article and all the interviews online now! Link in my bio! #apaheritagemonth ・・・
“I feel we’re finally starting to leave that mentality that if you find an Asian man attractive you might have a ‘thing’ for Asian men,” @teshrajan says to Very Good Light. “It’s not about that any more. We have the ability to play characters across the board that’s not defined by stereotypes. We’re not ashamed to show where we come from.” Read more about how Ritesh Rajan is #unabashedlyAsian in our cover story today (link in bio). 📷 @choutoo .
⚡️
☀️
Assisted by se.collier
Styled by @chrisbkim 
Written by @seoulcialite 
Produced by @akemilook
AD by @t_akino
Hair by @joelisv 
Makeup by @christina.roberson Thank you to everyone at @verygoodlight for bringing us all together and shining a light on something that is near and dear to my heart. check out the full article and all the interviews online now! link in my bio! #apaheritagemonth ・・・
“i feel we’re finally starting to leave that mentality that if you find an asian man attractive you might have a ‘thing’ for asian men,” @teshrajan says to very good light. “it’s not about that any more. we have the ability to play characters across the board that’s not defined by stereotypes. we’re not ashamed to show where we come from.” read more about how ritesh rajan is #unabashedlyasian in our cover story today (link in bio). 📷 @choutoo .
⚡️
☀️
assisted by se.collier
styled by @chrisbkim
written by @seoulcialite
produced by @akemilook
ad by @t_akino
hair by @joelisv
makeup by @christina.roberson
4,259 87 May 2019